Whilst I haven't been able to print for a number of years I have included these pictures of my lino cuts as they are very much part of my style and work.

 

A print from lino is built up in stages. I generally use 4 colours with one piece of line (known as the reduction method). Each colour portrays a different part  of the picture with the final stage 'bringing the image together'. Suddenly, from a sheet of various colours, you have a defined picture!

 

Once produced the lino design cannot be reprinted simply because at the end of the printing process the actual lino itself is systematically destroyed by the successive cuts for each colour.
Each design was limited to a production run of 25 in total.

 

(I do have a few prints available for sale; please use contact form if interested.)

 Click here to see the process involved in creating a finished lino print.

Albion Printing Press c.1867

I have been very fortunate to obtain an original Albion tabletop press made in London, UK.

 

It is made of cast iron and is therefore, incredibly heavy!

 

I like creating images with the computer, but using something as physical as a manual printing method has an entirely different appeal to it; I can only compare it to the reason why people use photographic film cameras, or have 'vintage' cars.

 

 Click here to see the process involved in creating a finished lino print.